Share Your World – 2014 Wk #25

Well, I’ve read Cee’s Share Your World and thought about participating but never quite got around to it. So, I thought, why not this time! Better late than never (maybe?)!!

What is your favorite type of dog?  (can be anything from a specific breed, a stuffed animal, drawing, cartoon or character in a movie or TV show)

This is a tough answer for me because every breed (pure and mixed) I’ve been exposed to have been wonderful and wonderfully perfect in their own ways. Of the dogs, I have most experience with, I would at least narrow it down to Boston Terrier, Maltese, Great Dane and Poodle. Of those, I suppose if I could only choose one, I’d probably go with the Boston Terrier. It was my first.

HAPPY

HAPPY

Name one thing not many people know about you.

I once worked for about a year as a fully sworn police officer assigned to patrol.

Have you ever gone scuba diving?  If you haven’t, would you want to?

I always loved to swim, especially when I was younger. I always preferred swimming pools where I could see what I was swimming with! But I think if I had had any friends who did scuba diving and would have encouraged me, I would have at least tried it.  And, since I’m still breathing, if the opportunity arises, I may still try it yet!

What was the most important event in your life last week? (anything goes it can be a good nights sleep, finished a reading book,winning the lottery, or getting married)

Wow, an important event last week. I’m drawing a blank other than I’m still here this week and able to blog! I did finish reading a book and started another.

Bonus question:  What are you grateful for from last week, and what are you looking forward to in the week coming up?

I am truly grateful for EVERYTHING from last week. My family, my friends, my health, my home, my freedoms, my computer, my work, my play…. You get the idea!

And in the week coming up, we’ve planned a day at the beach. It’s been a long time so I’m looking forward to that. I’m also looking forward to the 4th of July fireworks and the celebrations of our country’s independence.

For more information on participating in Cee’s Share Your World Challenge and/or to view additional entries, please click on the logo:

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Law and Order

The Daily Prompt: Snapshot Stories — Open the first photo album you can find — real or virtual, your call — and stop at the first picture of yourself you see there. Tell us the story of that photo.

Okay, you asked for it. Well, maybe you didn’t really ask for it. But I’m going to give it to you. First album, first photo of me that I find. I must admit I ran across quite a few early photos. But what can I say about this one? Really, all I can tell you about this photo is that it is of me. I can’t tell you how old I was (guessing somewhere around two maybe?). We were in Columbus, Ohio but I’m not sure if we were living at the Jefferson Hotel (father was manager) at the time of this picture. As you can see, I don’t know anything about photo restoration and this one is in very poor condition.

Linda_Fotor (2)

I grew up loving mysteries, and like many young girls during the 1950s and 1960s, I voraciously read (and vicariously lived) as Nancy Drew. When I was older, I worked with the police department from 1974-75 as a patrol officer.  But reality set in and I realized I didn’t want to be the one GOING TO a shooting in progress. So my working life was spent working with attorneys safely tucked behind a typewriter/computer. But I never lost my love of a good mystery and I still love good old target shooting! And I must say, I’m pretty good at it even if I do say so myself!

Focused

Daily Prompt: Papa Loves Mambo

What sort of music was played in your house when you were growing up? What effect, (if any) did it have on your musical tastes?

Oh, my stars! When I opened up my email and saw this Daily Prompt, I actually laughed out loud.  The words to that song, Papa Loves Mambo, popped right into my head along with several others from the mid-1950s. At that time, most of the music I listened to belonged to my older brother (11 years my senior). I, of course, had songs such as “How Much is That Doggy in the Window” and other popular tunes from singers/actors such as Burl Ives, Gene Autry and Hopalong Cassidy. But the ones I remember most and thought of first when I saw this prompt were my teenage (then) brother’s records. I assume they were pretty much the hits of the day. Sometimes when I want to be silly around people now, I’ll start singing or saying the words to such tunes such as these:

Green Door

Me Make Um Pow Wow

Istanbul (not Constantinople)

Okay, if you’re through laughing, you can pick yourself up off the floor. Sheesh, I was only about six years old. Obviously, they were my formative years because the words and music stayed with me! Of course, it wasn’t long after that (probably somewhere around 1957-1958) my best friend and I taught ourselves how to jitterbug to some of these 1950s hits by watching American Bandstand!

Yes, I really do like a lot of the 50s music. But the truth of the matter is that I have always liked and will always prefer the sounds of the 1960s and 1970s. And that’s just the way it is — I mean the way I am! I’m not about to start listing all my favorites from my teen years. We’d be here all week!

Daily Prompt: Our House

From the Daily Prompt:

What are the earliest memories of the place you lived in as a child? Describe your house. What did it look like? How did it smell? What did it sound like? Was it quiet like a library, or full of the noise of life? Tell us all about it, in as much detail as you can recall.

Barrington2_Fotor

I lived in this English Tudor from about 3 until I was 6.  That house has, I believe, formed my entire taste in homes and furnishing styles.  Course, I guess they do say those are the “formative” years!!  I still have so many memories from those few years in that house.

Dad_Fotor

I remember Dad’s strawberry patch in the back yard. I can still remember him complaining about the birds getting his strawberries. So, he took some chicken wire and made a frame to cover the patch. He said it worked perfectly to keep the birds out; if he could only find something to keep the little fingers out!

There was Mom’s flower garden and rose bushes. She had every color rose and tulip and I can still smell that beautiful strong floral scent. I don’t know all the different kinds of flowers she had. But I remember the beauty. I’m just sad that I have no pictures. I have great memories of that backyard. That’s where my mother would sunbathe on her quilt while teaching me the alphabet and to count to 100.

I remember my Dad stopping the car at the end of the driveway when he was getting home from work, putting me on his lap and letting me “drive” the car up the driveway!

This is Mom and me in the living room. I’m all dressed up because I was a flower girl in a wedding. I have no clue whose wedding!

_FoMomtor

Our house backed up to the high school football stadium. My Dad and brother would go up on top of the garage after each high school football game to gather up the lost items/money from the overzealous patrons!  Having the stadium there also gave us the PERFECT view of the fireworks each 4th of July.  I remember picking and eating the wild rhubard that grew behind the neighbor’s garage; climbing trees — including the neighbor’s cherry tree and eating the good ones at the top; learning to ride my bike; my best friend Dodi.  As a side note, after 60 years, I have reconnected with Dodi via Facebook and email! Amazing.

One time when my aunt (my mom’s twin sister) was visiting, she and the rest of the family were outside.  I was probably no older than four. I went up to the attic, which had been converted into my brother’s private sanctuary (he’s 11 years older than me), where I had no business. But, for whatever reason, I decided to look out the open, screened window at everyone. Lo and behold, next thing I know is that the screen starts to fall. Well, since I didn’t want to get into trouble, I held onto that screen while hanging half in and half out of the window. I remember screaming my head off. Next thing, my aunt just happens to hear/see me and she starts screaming and running. Needless to say, they got to me in time! So much hugs and yelling. Imagine nearly falling out of the third floor attic window because I wouldn’t let go of the screen when it fell out. You can almost make out the window at the very top on the side of the house. 

I had my Boston Terrier, Happy, then. My constant and faithful companion. Bostons do have bull dog traits — no wait, that’s bull headed traits! I was upstairs on the second floor getting ready to take Happy for a walk in the neighborhood. He had his leash on him and we started down the stairs. We were about halfway down the stairs and something excited him. He took off and dragged me down the remainder of the stairs. At least they were carpeted and I was just scared and not hurt. My dad caught me at the bottom and tried to console me by telling me I should have just let go of the leash. Hmm, I see a pattern developing.

I remember the playroom off my bedroom entered through my closet; my Mom decorating my bedroom in pink and white, stenciling and handpainting a big “L” on my bed’s footboard.

So many more memories of that time and place. But please don’t ask me what all I did yesterday! I can’t remember!

The Long and Short of It!

I remember one summer back in the 50s, I guess I was probably about eight to ten years old, and my parents took me from Ohio to Kentucky to spend some summer time with my cousin, Carol Sue. She was a year younger than me and we were like sisters. That summer we did everything together.

Carol Sue was going to get to go to a beauty parlor (they were called parlors back then!) and get her hair cut. I really wanted to go, too. So, my aunt had me write my Mom and Dad and ask if I could have $5 to go with Carol Sue and get a haircut. When the money arrived, off we went to get our haircuts. We went by ourselves because the shopping center was within walking distance.

Carol Sue went first and when she was done I really liked her haircut. So, I jumped up into the chair and told the lady that I wanted the same haircut. She hemmed and hawed and talked to the other ladies in the shop. She kept asking me if I was sure it was okay with my mother if she cut my hair. “Of course,” I said, “She gave me the money to come here!” And she proceeded to give me a haircut. I loved it!

A short time later, my parents came to pick me up. I remember standing in the living room with Carol Sue and my aunt. I was so excited to see them again even though I had had such a wonderful time at my cousin’s house.

My mother was the first one through the front door closely followed by my father. As soon as she walked in, she took one look at me, screamed and fell back into my confused father’s arms. He took one look at me and he started yelling, “What did you do to your hair? Look what you’ve done to your mother! Your hair….! Your mother….!” He stuttered those phrases about two or three times. I didn’t understand what the big deal was.

That was about the time they began “yelling” (my parents never really yelled, they just voiced disapproval) at my aunt. Well, the big deal was that my mother loved my hair. I suppose my dad did too. It went all the way down my back to just below my waist and it was thick and wavy.

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My mother recovered. She said that when she sent me the money to go with Carol Sue to get a haircut, she thought I was just going to get a trim. My aunt started in on how she hated long hair on an active child. It was impossible to untangle and it would grow back. My aunt survived.

I had gone to the beauty parlor with waist-length hair and I came out with the style of the day – a pixie cut – one-inch all over!  I don’t have any pictures of myself with it but here’s a Google image I found that would have been similar.

Source: Google Images

Source: Google Images

Everyone survived! My folks took me home and my hair grew out again! You know, now that I think about it, I don’t think I ever got to spend the summer with Carol Sue again.  Hmmmm….

Riding the Rails During the Great Depression

Well, I’ve been waiting for a notification from WordPress that I’ve reached my one year anniversary blogging. Oops! It never arrived. I knew it was January but didn’t remember the date. So, silly me, I went and looked and I missed it! But that’s okay. I thought what I would do is repost my very first ever blog entry. When I first started my blog, I was just going write about my family history. It didn’t take long for me to realize that the information I had was not much at all! So, I decided to branch out and started adding bits of life in general. As many things often do, I find it is branching again as I have now added my new hobby of photography. Enjoy!

LIVING WITH MY ANCESTORS

In 1931, at the age of 20, my Dad and 7 of his friends left their homes in Kentucky and headed West on the rails during the Great Depression. Dad kept a little diary of the trip in a small notebook written in pencil.

Following are a few excerpts from his travel diary (written in blue italics) with some of my own comments inserted in regular text:

The date is Wednesday, April 22, 1931.  It’s raining and snowing.  I have a one-way ticket to Portland, Ore. We catch train No. 1 bound for Cincinnati and bid Ashland goodbye at 8:55 a.m. There are eight of us. All nice fellows to be sure. Their names are Charles E. Ball, Bennet Tussey, Sam Elsworth and myself of Ashland. Paul A. Vaughan of Ironton, O. Charles R. “Buzz” Waldron of Russell, Ky. Kenneth Ames of Catlettsburg, Ky. And Louis E. Hannon of Maysville…

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Pinky!

Ode to Pinky

I think that I shall never see

A bunny lovely as Pinky

Yep, pure and complete corn! But, what do you expect when you’re talking about a bunny that’s at least as old, if not older, than me?  HA!  That’s right.  My little Pinky.  We have a history together, Pinky and me, yes we do.  Why, I bet that bunny came into my life when I was about three months old.  Do I dare say that I’m just weeks away from turning 65?  Okay, I won’t say it.  We’ve been through a lot together, Pinky and me.  You can think all you want that I’m nuts but I’ve kept this little bunny with me my whole life.  In my youngest years, Pinky was my “security blanket”.  Unlike Linus, I found that it was much easier and more convenient to carry around Pinky rather than dragging some old blanket all over the place.

I couldn’t go to sleep at night until I had Pinky safely tucked in, far away from any edges of the bed. Oh, my, we certainly wouldn’t want any part of him to extend over the edge of the bed and then suddenly be taken by those monster things that always lurked just out of sight under the bed.  Why I’d sooner have hanged my own foot over the edge than any part of Pinky.

Are you wondering what he looks like? Well, here’s a picture of him now.  Turns out I don’t seem to have any pictures of him when we were young.  I will say that we both definitely looked a lot better back then!  He measures 9 1/2 inches from the top of his ear to the tip of his leg.  So, you see, he would have been much more manageable than some old blanket.

Pinky

Ah, it brings to mind the words of that immortal poem by who knows who that goes, “Fuzzy Wuzzy was a bear (insert bunny even though it won’t rhyme!), Fuzzy Wuzzy had no hair, Fuzzy Wuzzy wasn’t very fuzzy, was he?”  Hoo boy, we really did say those things!  Yep, when Pinky was younger, he was covered in a soft blue-grey fuzz.  His ears, and the ends of his arms and legs were covered in a soft pink fabric.  At one time he had two eyes! And, yes, the eyes were made of a hard plastic or glass, I can’t tell.  And I didn’t swallow it!  Now the fuzz is practically all gone.  The funny thing is that it’s like it has disintegrated on its own because I don’t remember him being that bare when I put him away.

I remember the first time I “lost” him.  Or should I say, I remember the first time I remember I lost him.  I was probably about three or four years old.  One day he just seemed to vanish from the house.  It didn’t make any sense to me.  I cried for what seemed like at least three days.  My parents turned the house upside down looking for him if for no other reason than to just shut me up!  I knew I wouldn’t have lost him.  Suddenly one day he just showed up.  Truth?  I think my older brother had hidden him from me.  It’s one of those things you’ll never know.

Anyone remember traveling before we had Interstates?  Now, I’m really showing my age.  Anyway, we used to travel between our little town in northwestern Ohio to visit my Mom’s family in Lexington, Kentucky.  Two lane roads all the way.  And my Dad was the type that (1) he always traveled at night because of less traffic and (2) he loved to stop at little diners at almost every little town to sit at the counter, have a cup of coffee and talk to the people.  Well, on one of those trips, being a very sleepy child, I left Pinky at some diner.  I have no idea how many miles we had driven before I started crying for my long lost friend.  And wouldn’t you know, my Dad actually turned the car around and went back and retrieved my Pinky for me.  I know that what he really wanted to do was to keep going on the road but he did that for me.

I remember a time, oh, I was probably about eight years old.  I decided on my own that Pinky needed a bath.  I doubt he’s what you would term washable but I did it anyway.  It probably would have worked out just fine but, kid that I was, I put him in a plastic bag with wooden colored pick-up sticks.  My goodness, for a long time that bunny had so many different colors on him.  But time has a way of taking care of just about everything!

Well, enough reminiscences.  These things only came to my mind because I was going through some things and “found” Pinky again.  It’s funny the things we attach ourselves to.  Anyway, I hope I haven’t completely bored you!

BENJAMIN B. ARTHUR and POLLY ANN BURGESS

My paternal grandparents.

Benjamin was born in 1877 in Lawrence County, Ohio to John Riley ARTHUR and Amanda Jane GIBSON. He had two brothers, Joseph C., born 1880, and Luther A., born 1882. He married Polly Ann BURGESS on March 30, 1907 in Logan, West Virginia. Polly was born in 1888 in Logan, West Virginia to John BURGESS and Sarah E. WHITE. Ben and Polly had two sons, John Preston, born on Christmas day 1907 and my father, Luther Paul, born 1910. Polly died in April 1912 of consumption (TB). I believe that, based on some old postcards between Polly and her sister and aunt, she had been sick for probably about a year.

I have not been able to find Polly on any U.S. Census for 1910. Based on the postcards I have addressed to her, she was living in Ironton, Ohio in 1908, 1909 and possibly 1910. I have a Ben B. Arthur (unconfirmed as my grandfather, although all information of age and place of birth for him and parents is correct) living as a boarder on the 1910 census in McDowell County, West Virginia, over 3.5 hours away from Ironton, Ohio (by car per Mapquest today). I become skeptical about this being my Benjamin because I wonder why he would need to go so far away for work, especially since in 1910 she was expecting the birth of my father.

Polly Ann Burgess Arthur

Polly Ann Burgess Arthur

John Preston and Luther Paul

John Preston and Luther Paul

The little fragments of memories of conversations I had with Dad about his family seems to indicate that after his mother died, the boys spent a lot of time with their grandparents. At that time, it would have been with his grandfather’s second wife, Mary Samantha KORN Arthur. Dad also always talked fondly of his step-aunt, Jennie, who married a Wyatte COPELAND but never spoke to me of his father, Benjamin. On one of his postcards from Yellowstone he refers to Jennie Arthur COPELAND as “Mom”. For years I had the impression that Benjamin had also died young like Polly while Dad was just a young boy. That couldn’t have been further from the truth. Dad was 29 years old when his father died and they were living in the same town.

My mother’s youngest sister once told me she remembered Benjamin as being tall, thin and very nice looking. She said he was a very quiet man and always seemed to be well dressed. She said whenever she was around him she was more like in awe of him. I still hope someday to locate a photo of him.

WWI draft registration card pg 1Kind of an odd side note here. My notes indicate that sometime back in the 70’s my mother told me that my grandfather’s name was Benjamin Baxter Arthur. And that is how I’ve always researched him. I went back through all of my notes and hard copies (census records, obituary, marriage, etc.), and it seems he rarely, if ever, used his full name of Benjamin. I have found him as Benjamin B., Bennie B., Ben B., and B.B. but never with a middle name spelled out on anything. When I began new searches this month on Ancestry and FamilySearch I located a WWI draft registration card for him. On it he listed his name as Benjamin Burns Arthur. This gave me pause for thought because Burns is his mother’s maiden name, which is not unusual for the child to have as their middle name. Maybe I’ll get lucky and someone out there might have some information to share! You just never know!

The 1930 Ashland City Directory lists Benjamin as a carpenter living on Crooks Street with Mary ARTHUR, widow. I believe this would have been his stepmother, Mary Samantha KORN ARTHUR.

Then in 1933, the Ashland City Directory lists Benjamin as a carpenter, still living on Crooks Street, but now living with John ARTHUR (this would be his eldest son, a radio repairman), Mary ARTHUR (his stepmother, widow), and Paul ARTHUR (his youngest son [my father], bellboy at Ventura Hotel).

Benjamin died in Ashland, Boyd County, Kentucky in 1939.

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Luther A. Arthur wrote a letter to my father, Paul, in 1954. He is responding to a letter inquiry Dad made to him asking about the Arthur family. I wish I had a copy of his inquiry to Luther but wishing doesn’t make it so. Although a lot of the letter is information unrelated specifically to my grandparents, I still want to include it. I imagine in time I’ll be drawing more from this letter as I work on other members in the line.

The following is a transcription of the letter:

July 15, 1954

Mr. Paul Arthur
Hotel Jefferson
17 East Spring St.
Columbus 15, Ohio

Dear Nephew:

I certainly was glad to get your wonderful letter of July 11th  and the information it contained.

You did very well, even if it is a characteristic of the Arthur family not to write letters. I have noticed this myself. I do not mind writing since in a way I can use a typewriter, but if I had to do it in long hand it would (be) both difficult for me to write and for the one addressed to read it.

I will tell you all I know about the Arthur family and it is not much. I have a very hazy rememberance (sic) of your great-grandfather and mother on the Arthur/side. I do not recall her first name, but he went by the name of Press Arthur. Whether “Press” was a short way of pronouncing a longer name, or the real name, I do not know. He was a Baptist minister so I have been told. Her name was also Arthur before marriage, but it was said they were no relation.

Caleb and Willis Arthur, were my uncles. Your grandfather’s brothers. It seems that there was also a sister of my father’s who lived at one time in Unity Ky., but I am not clear on this, and it has been so long since I have back there that I don’t know what happened to her and her children. I do not know what happened to Caleb and Willis Arthur and cannot recall whether I saw them when I was back there in 1923 or not.

Your grandmother (my mother) was a Gibson. Daughter of Lewis Gibson, and I believe her mothers name was Ollie McCorkle. She was born on Leatherwook (sic) Creek (back of Ironton) Ohio. This great grandfather of yours died age 93 and is buried at Getaway Ohio. By his first and second wife he had 16 children. Two of them lived to be 93, but they are all dead now but Jesse B. Gibson, who lives some place in Florida.

This grandmother of yours had three boys. Your father, one they always called Joey (I suppose his name was Joseph) and myself. I do not recall ever seeing Joey. I do not know his age when he died and do not know where he was buried.

When I was less than a year old, your grandmother (my mother) died. I do not even have a picture of her, but those who knew her have always spoken very highly of her. I have been told your father resembled her more than Joey or myself.

When my mother died, I being the baby of the family, my father gave me to a childless aunt to raise.

After that I do not suppose I saw my father more than half a dozen times in my life.

There are a number of Arthurs left in Lawrence County Ohio. On Soliday Creek, which is near Southpoint Ohio.

Urania Neal, 627 South High St., Huntington, W. Va., is a daughter of Joe Arthur, and he was your grandfather’s cousin.

Bess W. Gibson, who lives at 1204(?) Charleston St. Huntington, is my cousin and your second cousin.

There is a tradition in the family that an Arthur was with General Washington when he crossed the Delaware, and our family has usually had a painting of this event in the family.

This is about all I can think of concerning our family and probably all I know.

Regarding your question:  “In your youth was there bad feelings in the family?” So far as I know, the answer is “no.” If there was it was even before my time and I havn’t (sic) heard of it.

It is true we did not visit each other very often, but that may have been due to the distance. While it would not be considered great with present means of transportation, in those days we had to walk.

I know your father and myself visited all branches of the family and seemed to be welcome everywhere. I do not recall my father visiting any of them, but remember again, that I did not see him more than half a dozen times in my life, so I do not know what he did.

I am glad to hear about your family and the news you gave me about the others.

My daughter lives in Long Beach which is about twenty minutes drive from here. She has two children and the newspaper clipping herewith will give her picture and also that of the oldest child. The other child is a boy. This daughter of mine, I gave her the best education money could buy and she can teach in any school in California, but she does not teach, preferring to take care of her family.

This is about all I can think of at this time, and again I thank you for your letter.

                                                                        Sincerely,

                                                                        LUTHER ARTHUR

P.O. Box 42
Huntington Beach, California

OVER … OVER … OVER

Near Chillicothe Ohio you will find the Logan Elm. There is a monument there and on this monument you will find the name of General John Gibson. It was at this place that peace was made with the Indians and the treaty was never borken (sic). The General was a relative of ours.

Luther’s letter has given me some more leads to pursue which is exciting. There is always more to learn about one’s family. The search is definitely a never-ending story! It’s not always easy but it’s definitely a roller coaster ride of adventure! Especially when you come upon a hidden treasure!

A Word A Week Challenge: Distant

Coming in a bit late this week with this but I thought it might be fun. I’ve been spending my week training for my new home-based job and trying to do some genealogy research and writing for a new entry.

Sue’s challenge this week is Distant. Please check out her blog A Word in Your Ear to learn more.

These are from a trip we made to Temple Square of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Salt Lake City, Utah in 2009. The pictures were taken with my old iPhone 3Gs and are unedited other than size. The photos were taken from the 26th floor of the Church Office Building.

TEMPLE SQUARE

TEMPLE SQUARE

CAPITOL BUILDING

CAPITOL BUILDING

Revolutionary War = Independence Day

washington_crossing_the_delaware_by_emanuel_leutze_mma-nyc_1851

Washington Crossing the Delaware byEmanuel Leutze
Metropolitan Museum of Art – New York City – 1851

Since I began delving into my genealogy, it seems that especially at times like this my thoughts are turned to my ancestors who sacrificed so much. I present just a few of the family patriots related to me and mine who served so valiantly. I know that there are more and I will find them and honor them when I do.

John Arthur, Sr.

Wounded in Yorktown in final battle with Cornwallis. On 17th May 1843, in Bedford County, Virginia John made a declaration for his pension stating he was 85 years of age.  He married 12 Oct 1784 in Bedford County, Virginia to Elizabeth ADDAMS (ADAMS), with the consent of John ADDAMS.  In his pension papers it states that she was the daughter of John & Sarah ADDAMS.  Elizabeth was born 28 Sep 1769.  John ARTHUR died 24 Aug 1850, Bedford County, Virginia.  John ARTHUR was drafted into the Bedford Militia and served the following four regular tours:  about the last of May 1780 under Capt. Thomas LEFTWICH.  He served at Gate’s Defeat at Camden, SC; from 15 Jan 1781 three months in Capt. Isaac CLEMANS’ Company during the siege of Ninety-Six in SC under Gen. GREEN; Sept.1781, two months under Capt. John TRIGG in Col. TUCKER’s Regiment.  He was injured by a cannon ball from the enemies’ guns 19 Oct 1781 during battle of Yorktown and surrender of Lord CORNWALLIS for which he was granted a pension from the State of Virginia. He received wounds to both of his knees, right arm and under jaw. He was granted 100 acres 11 Apr 1818 Bedford Co.

Joel Arthur

Joel ARTHUR, born in 1761, Bedford Co., VA fought under Capt. John TRIGG, Lieut. John DAVIS, Ensign William HANDCOCK, under the command of General MULLENBURG, Col. MERRIWETHER and Major McCLURE in 1780 around Portsmouth, VA.  In June 1781 for three months in the militia under Capt. Thomas LEFTWICH and Major OVERSTREET by way of Richmond and was stationed between Little York and Norfolk.

Thomas “Tom Titt” Arthur, Jr.

Thomas served in the Revolutionary War. He was a resident of Bedford Co. living “between the waters of Goose Creek and Stauton River” during that time. He was in the battle of “Gates’ Defeat”, Siege of 96. It was stated that his nickname as a boy was “Tom Titt” and after he came from the war, he was called “Squirrel Tom” to distinguish him from the others of the same name in that neighborhood. He stated his brother, John ARTHUR, as 85 yrs old in 1843, living in Bedford Co. and had served two tours in the Revolution with Thomas.

Matthew Wallace

1744-1831. Matthew was listed as a private in the 4th Class of Chanceford Township. Inhabitants in Capt. Joseph Reed’s Company in a 26 Apr 1778 return.

Jeremiah Burns, Sr.

Assisted in establishing American Independence while acting in the capacity of Private.  His services during the Revolutionary War were as follows:  From Records Nat’l Archives, enlisted at Bedford Co, VA in 1776 for a period of three years as a private in Captain George Lambert’s Company, commanded by Colonel George Matthews under Major General Nathaenel Greene, it being the 14th Virginia Regiment, afterwards consolidated into the 7th.  At expiration of three years he reenlisted for another three years.  In 1781 he was marched to Yorktown and served in that seige.  He also had served in the battles of Germantown and Manmouth.  He was discharged soon after the Seige of York by Col. Roan.  Jeremiah came with his family to KY and settled in that part of Greenup Co. that became Lawrence Co. when created from Floyd & Greenup Counties in 1821, effective 11 Feb 1821.  On 28 Jul 1818 he applied for his pension.  Certificate of Pension No. W.F. 2063 was issued.

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